Tags » Tractatus Logico Philosophicus

The Philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein

Austrian-born philosopher. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) originally studied engineering. In 1912, he went to Cambridge and became a student of one of the founders of the analytic philosophy, Bertrand Russell (1872—1970). 1,521 more words

Literary Theory

Tractatus Logico-Ductus: a Logical Leadership Treatise

Dear Mr. President,

It’s always struck me how demanding it must be to read all the hundreds of pages of material that stream across your desk every day: the briefings, legislation being considered by Congress (which you must absorb, then sign or veto), reports from multiple federal agencies, more reports from the White House staff … it’s an immense job in itself, aside from all your other responsibilities. 643 more words

Language And Related

Tolstoy Journal, January 31, 2017

Last night I read no Tolstoy but I did talk with F. A. Flowers III who had left a message on my phone saying he had gotten the letter I had written him about his introduction to… 1,006 more words

Blog Post

Lab Immaginazione: Jonas e Wittgenstein

Venerdì 25 novembre, a partire dalle ore 16,30, presso Aula 10 di Palazzo Ricci avrà luogo il terzo incontro del Laboratorio su immagine e immaginazione, coordinato da Luigi Filieri. 21 more words

Suggerimenti Eventi

Review: Philosophical Investigations

Philosophical Investigations by Ludwig Wittgenstein

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you read first Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, and then follow it with his Philosophical Investigations, you will treat yourself to perhaps the most fascinating intellectual development in the history of philosophy. 2,131 more words

Books

Problems at the Intersection of Aesthetics and Ethics

The very excellent Seth Vannatta in Response: The Digital Journal of Popular Culture Scholarship. I’d suggest that readers also think about Wittgenstein’s idea in the… 32 more words

Aesthetics

Academic writing

My new article ‘Redetermining paradigmatic norms: is there any hope for academic writing?’ has been published at The Conversation. The article asks whether academic writing has improved 20 years after the Sokal Affair, in which a scholar sent a ‘fake’ article full of obscure writing to an academic journal, to see if they would publish it. 1,168 more words