Tags » Trademarks

Jury Decides Costco Owes Tiffany $5.5M Over Alleged Copycat Rings

Since 2012, Costco and Tiffany have been fighting in court over the question of whether “Tiffany” describes a jewelry company and a prestigious brand, or a just a style of diamond solitaire ring. 207 more words

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Startup

Can you trademark an offensive name or not? US Supreme Court to decide

(Source: arstechnica.com)

The Supreme Court on Thursday said it would decide, once and for all, whether federal intellectual property regulators can refuse to issue trademarks with disparaging or inappropriate names. 590 more words

Technology

The Value Behind a Trade Mark

A trade mark is a word, name, symbol, or design used to identify and distinguish goods in commerce. Businesses across all industries use trade marks to identify a particular brand via words, logos, and/or colours: such marks prompt recognition through marketing and branding.  168 more words

Intellectual Property

New binding ruling benefits owners of trademarks registered in Mexico that claimed date of first use.

The Mexican trademark system follows the first-to-file rule. However, use of a trademark in Mexico prior to the application may be relevant. Trademark applicants are allowed to claim a date of first use in Mexico. 1,162 more words

Mexico

Arnold Palmer: Remembering the Intellectual Property Mogul & Golf Legend

Arnold Palmer, the man who won the Masters four times (1958, 1960, 1962, and 1964), one of the faces of the sport, passed away on Sunday. 598 more words

Sports Law

"Disparaging" Federal Trademark Registrations: Gearing Up for the Main Event

Today the Supreme Court agreed to decide an ongoing conflict, pitting a trademark registrant’s First Amendment rights against longstanding law precluding trademark registration of “disparaging” marks. 475 more words

Court Cases