Tags » Union Membership

Collective-bargaining agreement coverage and union density rates, major economies, latest available data

In the USA, UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, if you want to be covered by a union collective-bargaining agreement, join a union. Does not seem to matter if you are a union member in France, Germany, Portugal, Spain and the Netherlands and to a lesser extent Italy because you is covered by collective bargaining agreements in most jobs. 55 more words

Labour Economics

Union density rates in Scandinavia since 1960

Union membership has been very high all the time in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

Source: OECD Stat Extract.

Labour Economics

Union density rates in Germany, France and Italy

There are large differences in unionisation rates between the three countries. France has always had low levels of unionisation which halved since the 1970s. Italy had a sharp boost in union membership in the number of unions in the 1960s and 70s. 47 more words

Labour Economics

Union density rates in USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand since 1960

Unions have been in a long-term decline in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and the USA for as far back as survey and administrative data can be collected. 52 more words

Politics - USA

What is a Union and What it Means to Belong to a Union

I would like to explain what a Union is and what a Union means to me.

Many people in the history of our country made great sacrifices so that Unions could become the legitimate voice for its members. 296 more words

Posts

Norma Rae Redux

Unions have long been a cornerstone of the Canadian workforce. Their members have been linked to a strong middle class, a generally prosperous and stable economy, increased job security, tax support enough to sustain robust public services and healthy families. 294 more words

Are unions like the dog that caught the car?

Did you ever see one of those old TV cartoons of a dog chasing a car and finally catching a tire, and the sound effects going “flippity-whump, flippity-whump”? 717 more words

Op-ed