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Is 4% GDP Growth Real?

Popular Economics Weekly

Graph: Econoday

Many economists, including Trump economic advisor Larry Kudlow, are predicting up to 4 percent economic growth over the next few quarters. 622 more words

Weekly Financial News

Inflation On the Rise

The Mortgage Corner

Inflation is finally rising enough to bite into consumers’ paychecks. It is also a sign that economic growth is increasing at least temporarily, as consumers borrow more to buy more. 405 more words

Weekly Financial News

Consumers ‘Another Day Older and Deeper in Debt...”

Popular Economics Weekly

“Ya load sixteen tons, whaddya get, another day older and deeper in debt…”, the famous folksong sung by Burl Ives and Tennessee Ernie Ford describes today’s consumers who are still spending huge amounts of borrowed money at the end of this second longest business cycle since the end of WWII. 370 more words

Weekly Financial News

Trumpcare is Killing US!

Financial FAQs

It took 4 hours to coax Patricia Okoumou, a Congolese immigrant, down from the Statue of Liberty while wearing a t-shirt that said, “Trumpcare Makes Us Sick.” It was serendipitous timing. 668 more words

Weekly Financial News

June Employment Robust—For How Long?

The Mortgage Corner

More workers are being hired in manufacturing and professional services in June’s unemployment report. But this is before the trade war now taking hold with at least 5 allies and trading partners. 454 more words

Weekly Financial News

Trumpcare Makes Us Sick, or Worse!

Financial FAQs

It took 4 hours to coax Patricia Okoumou, a Congolese immigrant, down from the Statue of Liberty while wearing a t-shirt that said, “Trumpcare Makes Us Sick.” It was serendipitous timing. 515 more words

Weekly Financial News

What are Corporations Doing With Their Tax Cut?

Popular Economics Weekly

Economists are predicting second quarter GDP growth of as much as 3.8 percent, up from 2.2 percent in Q1 2018. But it may be a one-time surge, as all indications are the massive 2017corporate tax cut that lowered their nominal tax rate from 35 to 21 percent won’t create any more jobs than are normal in a fully-employed economy by investing, say, in more production capacity (i.e., in capital expenditures). 543 more words

Weekly Financial News