Tags » William Herschel

Happy Discovery Day, Neptune!

Hey, everyone. Happy Friday. Thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re having a great day to end the week, and a great, starry weekend ahead of you. 473 more words

Who Are The Iconic Men of Georgian Bath?

It’s Jane Austen week here in Bath and everyone here is talking about Pride and Prejudice’s iconic writer.

Over the last few days, Austen has become an even larger conversation starter than usual and is continually referred to as Bath’s most famous resident. 617 more words

History

About the author, a picture of Harrison Chase

I was practicing my about the author photo face on the tube this morning.

I don’t want it to look too happy, I want people to look at it and think “Wow, that guy’s deep, what’s going through his mind? 489 more words

Man-Bats and Bipedal Moon Beavers

January 10, 1834 was a remarkable day in the history of humankind. It was the day Sir John Herschel, a noted English astronomer and son of William Herschel, the discoverer of Uranus, first gazed through his super-powered telescope and observed life on the moon. 841 more words

History

Triton

Welcome to Triton, the largest moon of Neptune! Triton is so great in size compared to the other moons of Neptune that its mass makes up 99.5% of Neptune’s moon system. 385 more words

A visit to the Herschel Museum

(cross-posted from easternblot.net)

The day after the Brexit referendum I went to visit a museum dedicated to two German immigrants, and some of England’s most prolific astronomers. 681 more words

Have Science Will Travel

Georgian Comet-Mania and the Man Who Began It

Last month I set out to research the Bath Road and stayed for a few days in Bath. Although I hadn’t intended finding out about the astronomer Sir William Herschel I found he was hard to miss and soon realised that his would have been a name on everyone’s lips in Georgian London – the instigator of a Georgian “comet craze.” 661 more words

Science & Technology