Tags » Wong Jing

Dolly’s Movie Treats #55

Today’s Lucky dip Movie pick is…

As toys, we all coming from our factories fully grown! Bet you not all knowing that ya? It is way we all made. 239 more words

Dolly Is The Boss

Film Review: 'From Vegas to Macau II'

Milking his cash cow until its udders shrivel, Hong Kong king of kitsch Wong Jing delivers a hatchet job with “From Vegas to Macau II,” a casino caper that fails to re-create the dynamic action and zany fun of the original hit. 846 more words

Reviews

BULLET AND BRAIN (2007) short review

A thriller set in the future for no discernible narrative or metaphorical purpose, and with no visible indicators other than a hideously fake-looking CGI futuristic train and a vaguely advanced-looking gun, Keung Kwok-Man’s  179 more words

Film Reviews

Mr & Mrs Player (2013) live action, movie - Hong Kong


comedy
director/writer: Wong Jing
starring: To Chapman, Chrissie Chau

Carson is a Feng Shui Master. Chai-Ling is a veterinarian. Both are “players.” The first time they met they were both running back and forth between two dates each. 140 more words

Watch

I CORRUPT ALL COPS (2009) review

Insanely prolific filmmaker Wong Jing (in 30 years, close to 200 films as a producer, a director and/or a writer) is known mainly for his shameless cash-grabbing, exploitative proclivities, extreme mining of film trends and taste for crass humor, but once in a while he decides to write and direct a film that can actually be taken seriously. 599 more words

Film Reviews

ONCE UPON A TIME IN SHANGHAI (2014) review

The sort-of real life story of Ma Wing Jing, a wholesome country boy with stunning fighting skills who comes to Shanghai to escape poverty, only to end up befriending a charismatic but shady mob boss and losing his soul in the process, has already been the subject of two high-profile films, Chang Cheh’s… 851 more words

Film Reviews

New York Asian Film Festival 2014

If you haven’t heard about the New York Asian Film Festival, you’ve been under a rock.  For lovers of Asian cinema, late June through mid July turns into the 12 days before Christmas or the 8 days of Hanukkah extended, depending on your faith (for your guilty pleasure).   486 more words

Nytimes