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Words of the Week 18/2016 - Oprah Winfrey

Words of the Week 18/2016

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Gail Winfrey (born January 29, 1954) is an American media proprietor, talk show host, actress, producer, and philanthropist. 97 more words

Entertainment

EP words of the week (#30): mamã / papá

Tomorrow is Mother’s Day ([o] Dia da Mãe) in Portugal (it always falls on the First Sunday of May; in Brazil it’s celebrated on the Second Sunday of the same month, just like in the United States). 143 more words

Words Of The Week

EP word of the week (#29): bebé

Portuguese has two different words for babybebé in Portugal and bebê in Brazil.

The word was brought from French bébé; while the Portuguese took the accent at face value (keeping the same accent from French, but applying Portuguese rules to the accent, therefore making the e an open vowel), Brazilians decided to keep the phonetics intact (since the acute accent in French is used for the exact same purpose as the circumflex in Portuguese: to close a vowel). 152 more words

Words Of The Week

Words of the Week 17/2016 - Nikita Khrushchev

Words of the Week 17/2016

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (April 15 1894 – September 11, 1971) was a politician who led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War. 87 more words

Entertainment

EP word of the week (#28): cravo

While the Portuguese word for carnation is the same everywhere – [o] cravo – only in Portugal does it have important symbolic value. Today – April 25th – is a public holiday, marking the day in 1974 when an armed (but mainly peaceful and deathless) revolution brought about the end of the  216 more words

Words Of The Week

“Dante writes that God is not merely a blinding vision of glorious light, but that He is, most of all, l’amour che move il sole e l’atre stelle…’ The love that moves the sun and the other stars.”

– Elizabeth Gilbert

Words Of The Week

EP word of the week (#27): pastel de nata

A Portuguese delicacy of worldwide renown, [o] pastel de nata is a staple of any Portuguese snack bar or pastelaria. To call it a simple custard tart is to underappreciate its amazing taste and different textures: a sweet, gooey custard topped by a burnt and bitter crust supported by a crispy, crumbly, consistent pastry. 195 more words

Words Of The Week