Tags » Writing Mechanics

Showing whose idea it was

Who is that masked man? By Carolyn Lehrke, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Your writing will be a mixture of your own conclusions and those of others. How do you clearly indicate which is which? 42 more words

Writing Mechanics

Alternative words

Pompous! by Stephen Lloyd-Smart, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Do you have a tendency to use long words in your writing when you don’t need to? Do you write “commence” instead of just “begin”; “in order that” instead of “so”; “numerous” instead of “many”; “utilise” instead of “use”? 54 more words

Academic Writing

BETA NOT

BETA THAN YOU

BETA ROUND THE BUSH

BETA THE DEVIL YOU KNOW

BETA, MISTREATA

BETA NOT

For a blog post on beta readers it seems appropriate to have a range of options for the title. 611 more words

Writing

Long subjects

A Most Serious Subject by Stuart Richards, Attribution-NoDerivs Licence

In scientific writing, there can be a tendency to write really long subjects in sentences. The subject is the thing which the sentence is about. 337 more words

Writing Mechanics

Compound adjectives

Cookie Pug in Red by Moro Fenrir, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Sometimes when we use more than one word as an adjective we need to join those words with a hyphen to show they belong together and make our meaning clear. 147 more words

Writing Mechanics

Vague antecedents

Who??? by John Carrel, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Words like “this” “these”, “it”, “their” “they” refer to other words. The words they refer to are nouns that have occurred previously. 132 more words

Writing Mechanics

Proofreading

The squirrel proof bird feeder, by Kathi, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Everyone makes mistakes when they write and so everyone has to proofread. But it can be hard to spot mistakes in your own work, because you know what you meant to write and that stops you seeing what you actually did write. 26 more words

Academic Writing